Meet our Patients

Manatees are one of Florida’s most recognizable species. Although their closest relative are elephants, they are often referred to as sea cows because they can weigh up to 3,500 pounds (1,590 kg) and eat an herbivorous diet. Manatees live in shallow, calm rivers, estuaries, saltwater bays, canals, and coastal areas and can move from fresh to salt water with no problem. Manatee’s biggest threats are humans. Boat strike injuries and entanglements in pollution are some of the main reasons why manatees come to the David A. Straz Manatee Critical Care Center at ZooTampa.

Meet out current patients:

 

Heinz:

-          Transfer from SeaWorld Orlando- Initial rescue was boat strike- lung injury

-          Rescued from Crystal River in September 2018

-          Female

-          Age is very difficult to estimate with adults- over 10 years at least

-          1200 lbs currently

-          Still under observation/care for her lung injury

Sriracho:

-          Transfer from SeaWorld Orlando – Initial rescue was with injured mom – Heinz.  He was still dependent on her at the time of rescue.  Has since weened.

-          Male

-          Under 2 years old approx.

-          Current Weight:  570 lbs

-          Now separated from mom since she is still under observation/critical care and he is old enough to be without her.  He schedule for a tentative release this winter

Cayo:

-          Rescued in 2015 for boat strike

-          He is non releasable due to his lung injury- Is lung is permanently damaged and he cannot control is buoyancy due to that.  He is what we call a sinker and stays at the bottom of the pool.  He is able to get to surface for breaths and food but would be unable to survive in the wild due to those injuries

-          Weight: 625

-          Age:  Under 6 years old

Fern:

-          Rescued May 8 from Charlotte County – Boat strike, pneumothorax (collapsed lung(s))

-          Age: under 10 years old

-          Weight:  740lbs

-          Still under observation/care but showing signs of improvement

Wilbur:

-          Rescued May 8 with injured Mom – Fern

-          Female

-          Age: under 1 years old

-          Current Weight: 305 lbs

Collie:

-         Rescued from Naples for boat strike, pneumothorax

-          Weight at rescue was 415 lbs

-          Under 2 years old

-          Stable, still under observation but progressing well

Slate:

-          Rescued as an orphaned calf from Crystal river in Feb 2018

-          Rehabbed by SeaWorld.  Moved to Bishop aquarium to gain weight.  Moved to us due to Bishop aquarium construction

-          Weight on date of rescue 163 lbs

-          Current weight: is 516 lbs

-          He schedule for a tentative release this winter

Obsidian:

-          Rescued as an orphaned calf from Crystal river in Feb 2018

-          Rehabbed by SeaWorld.  Moved to Bishop aquarium to gain weight.  Moved to us due to Bishop aquarium construction

-          Weight on date of rescue 190 lbs

-          Current weight: 632 lbs

-          He schedule for a tentative release this winter

Tupper:

-          Rescued from Bradenton, Wares creek on Aug 28th

-          Rehabbed by SeaWorld.  Moved to Bishop aquarium to gain weight.  Moved to us due to Bishop aquarium construction

-          Buoyant on back end, believed to be GI related

-          Currently under close observation and treatment

-          Weight: 1125 lbs

 

Templeton:

-          Rescued 10-7-2019

-          Rescued from Charlotte County

-          Weighs 380 lbs – about 1 years old

-          Boat strike, pneumothorax

-          Still under treatment

Jenkins:

-          Rescued 10-15-2019

-          Rescued from Jenkins Creek, Hernando Beach

-          Weighs 520 lbs – about 2 years old

-          Boat strike, pneumothorax

-          Still under treatment

The David A. Straz Manatee Critical Care Center is at the forefront in the care and conservation of manatees. As one of only four manatee critical care and rehabilitation centers in the United States, ZooTampa has cared for more than 400 injured, sick and orphaned manatees. A dedicated team of animal care and veterinary staff tend to the manatees 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with the goal of releasing them back into Florida waters. Each visit helps us on our mission to preserve and protect wildlife.