Ferocious Fun is coming to ZooTampa

January 13 - April 28

Take a step back in time and encounter awe-inspiring creatures during this limited-time event. Running from January 13-April 28, get up close to 15 colossal animatronic predators of the past.

ZooTampa Membership

This event is free with admission to the Zoo. Get the best value out of your ZooTampa experience by upgrading to a membership so you can visit again and again at no additional cost.

Travel through time

Allosaurus animatronic

Allosaurus

The allosaurus is assumed to have similar hunting habits to the great horned owl which use soundless flight to sneak up on their targets, and sharp talons to grab and hold on to their prey.
Baryonyx animatronic

Baryonyx

Even though they are fish-eaters, baryonyx only wade in the water instead of swimming. Their nostrils are on the side of their snout rather than on top, as we might expect. These prehistoric predators are similar to modern gharials with their long snouts, numerous serrated teeth, and side-sweeping jaw for hunting fish.
Cryolophosaurus animatronic

Cryolophosaurus

Scientists believe that the distinct crest on their head was used for recognizing each other. Due to their size, they would have had very little competition for prey. At the time, they would have been considered the largest top predator, a title now held by Malayan Tigers.
Deinonychus animatronic

Deinoychus

Evidence suggests they were pack hunters that work together to catch a meal. Their long sickle-shaped talon on the hind foot could be used for hunting. These predators were thought to be active and agile hunters like North American river otters, which move quickly through the water to catch fish, frogs, and crustaceans.
Deltadromeus animatronic

Deltadromeus

Their long, slender limbs suggest that they are designed for running, and were likely warm-blooded. While we don't know much about their diet, it's thought they were like striped skunks who are opportunistic scavengers and help keep the environment clean.
Dire wolf animatronic

Dire Wolf

The dire wolf diet consisted of many animals including bison, ground sloth, camels, and horses (including their bones). It's believed that they were like African painted dogs which work together to hunt much bigger prey.
Giganotosaurus animatronics

Giganotosaurus

It is believed that giganotosaurus had a unique type of metabolism that aids their fast growth, helping make them one of the largest carnivores found. They are thought to have been similar to red wolves in that they formed small multi-generational packs that worked together to catch prey, but were also successful solo hunters.
Megalania animatronic

Megalania

Megalania is the largest lizard species we have ever identified on the planet. Scientists believe that they fulfilled a similar ecological role as the modern Komodo dragon, helping to limit the spread of disease by eating the carcasses of deceased animals.
Giant sea scorpion animatronic

Giant Sea Scorpion

Their body construction suggests they are adapted to a completely aquatic lifestyle. The giant sea scorpion is similar to the Florida Panther which is an ambush hunter that relies on its claws and strong forelimbs to grab and hold onto its prey.
Smilodon animatronic

Smilodon

Their most famous feature is their blade-like long canines, which could be up to 6 inches long and curve slightly backwards. They are similar to clouded leopards which has the largest canine teeth relative to the skull size of any modern cat species and can open its mouth extremely wide (about 100 degrees).
Suchomimus animatronic

Suchomimus

Their extended snout and long, thin teeth were better suited for seizing slippery prey, like fish, than hunting large dinosaurs. They likely used a stalk-and-catch method when they hunted, similar to modern day shoebill storks, which requires a great deal of stealth and patience.
Terror bird animatronic

Terror Bird

Terror birds are believed to have been extremely nimble and quick runners, able to reach speeds of 48 km/h (30 mph). Scientists believe that the Terror Bird was similar to seriemas which can also be found in the grasslands and woodlands of South America, and are carnivores that hunt small mammals, reptiles, and insects.
Titanoboa animatronic

Titanoboa

Titanoboa are believed to have been quick and efficient predators, making them very dangerous in the water. Scientists believe that Titanoboa was a constrictor--a snake that hunts by strangling its prey. Florida king snakes are also constrictors.
Rendering of what a megalodon shark may have looked like

Megalodon

Their teeth were thick and robust, built for grabbing prey and breaking bone. Their large jaw could exert a bite force stronger than any other animal. Scientists believe that the Megalodon was likely a keystone species in their environment, similar to alligators. They help keep the ecosystem in check by limiting the overpopulation of prey animals.
Suchomimus animatronic

Suchomimus

Their extended snout and long, thin teeth were better suited for seizing slippery prey, like fish, than hunting large dinosaurs. They likely used a stalk-and-catch method when they hunted, similar to modern day shoebill storks, which requires a great deal of stealth and patience.
Terror bird animatronic

Terror Bird

Terror birds are believed to have been extremely nimble and quick runners, able to reach speeds of 48 km/h (30 mph). Scientists believe that the Terror Bird was similar to seriemas which can also be found in the grasslands and woodlands of South America, and are carnivores that hunt small mammals, reptiles, and insects.

Grab a Bite

View Sensory Guide

ZooTampa has teamed up with the Center for Autism and Related Disabilities (CARD) at the University of South Florida to provide support and assistance to optimize the potential of people who are neurodiverse. You can view our sensory guide for Prehistoric Predators here.

We also recognize Autism Shifts, The Learning Academy, Autism Speaks, and the Diversity Action Coalition and applaud their efforts to promote inclusive experiences.